Anne Brontë: The Forgotten Sister and Firebrand Feminist

If you’ve spent any time on my blog or over on my instagram (link) you’ll know that I am a huge fan of the Brontë sisters. And whilst Charlotte, or more specifically her characters, have captured my heart I adore all the works produced by these singularly brilliant women writers.  One thing that has fascinated… Continue reading Anne Brontë: The Forgotten Sister and Firebrand Feminist

All the fun of the fair (or circus)

Readers I’ve noticed a little something of late, thanks in part to my reading A Girl Made Of Air - I love a book set in a circus.  Now yes I am aware that it is very niche, but bear with me on this one.  Lyrical and inventive, A Girl Made of Air is a… Continue reading All the fun of the fair (or circus)

Reading and Empathy:Can reading fiction make you a more empathetic person?

Can reading help you to understand societal issues and the life experience/lived experience of those who are different from you?  Studies have linked reading fiction with an increase in charitable giving, improvements in wellbeing and better relationship building. Studies have also found that reading can hugely benefit society at large, and empathy is key to… Continue reading Reading and Empathy:Can reading fiction make you a more empathetic person?

Review: The Mercies

Hello my dear readers, bibliophiles and bookworms. It’s been a little while since I posted a review, but I feel like I’ve picked a goodie to share with you today.  The Mercies by Karen Millwood Hargrave is the story of Maren, the most beguiling heroine you could possibly hope for. She is haunted by visceral… Continue reading Review: The Mercies

Otterly Amazing Reads: What Makes Historical Fiction?

A slightly different Otterly Amazing reads coming at you today. Throughout May I am celebrating all things historical fiction. I’m a huge fan of the genre, but this has not always been the case. It’s only in the last 8 years or so that I have become interested in the books set in the past;… Continue reading Otterly Amazing Reads: What Makes Historical Fiction?

Review: Conjure Women

And just like that I have a new contender for my favourite book of the year. Conjure Women is a deeply dark and haunting historical fiction, full of suspicion and suspense. For those who loved The Familiars, Essex Serpent, The Confessions of Frannie Langton and The Binding I think this will be your next book… Continue reading Review: Conjure Women

Otterly Amazing Reads: The Bell Jar and Milk and Honey

Otterly Amazing Reads: The Bell Jar by Sylvia Path Starting something new today on the blog which I hope you enjoy dear reader. Hopefully you have found my little corner of the internet because you are a bibliophile or at least you’re interested in hearing what I have to say about books.  Of course I… Continue reading Otterly Amazing Reads: The Bell Jar and Milk and Honey

Topics of Conversation: Desire, Difficult Conversations and An Even More Difficult Narrator

I’m writing this review feeling just a little bit unsure what I have just read because Topics of Conversation is unlike anything else I’ve read. An unreliable and at times unlikable narrator draws out, often inadvertently, the deepest secrets of those women she meets whilst also ruminating on her own existence. Miranda Popkey does not… Continue reading Topics of Conversation: Desire, Difficult Conversations and An Even More Difficult Narrator

Blackberry and Wild Rose and The Heavens: Both Brilliant Books, But Both Could Be So Much More

Dear reader, you find me once again in a bit of a dilemma. If you follow me on Instagram or happen to read my reviews on here then you’ll know that I’m a fan of a bit of historical fiction and of a bit of magical realism. In fact I’d say these are the two… Continue reading Blackberry and Wild Rose and The Heavens: Both Brilliant Books, But Both Could Be So Much More

The Girl Who Smiled Beads: An authentic, honest and fresh story about war and its effects

Having read Clemantine Wamariya  harrowing, human and ultimately hopeful account of her childhood as a refugee fleeing the civil war in Rwanda I’m genuinely unsure how to write a review. Partly because the central theme of this story is Warmariya attempt to find her voice, to take the pain and suffering of her young life… Continue reading The Girl Who Smiled Beads: An authentic, honest and fresh story about war and its effects